Wine Bottle Vase

 

Wine bottles are the easiest things to upcycle. The corks, caps, and bottle can all be used to make something else once the wine is gone. Don’t drink wine? It’s pretty easy to find used bottles around from other things. Try reusing a salad dressing bottle, milk bottle, or any narrow-necked glass container. Need some unique home decor? You only need to look to your empties for some inspiration.

Materials for this project:

  • wine bottle
  • twine
  • sticker or embellishment (optional)
  • Mod Podge
  • sponge brush
  • piece of pallet wood, cut to fit
  • split ring hanger
  • ceiling plate
  • threaded rod, cut to about 2.5 inches depending on the width of the bottle
  • wall hanger (picture frame hanger)
  • wood screws

First, start with a bottle that has a nice shape for a vase, or just one you happen to like. The narrower the bottle, the easier it will be to mount to the board. Paint Mod Podge on the bottle starting from the bottom and tightly wrap the cord/twine around the bottle, painting more as needed. Mod Podge is basically glue and although it will dry clear, you will be able to see it on the glass in any open space. Once you have wrapped all the twine you like, let it dry for a while to set. Add your sticker or embellishment to the bottle where you determine the front to be.

Second, cut your threaded rod to the length needed to keep the bottle hanging straight from the board. It needs to be long enough to screw into the split ring hanger and the ceiling plate, holding the bottle away from the board. You can cut a length of it with a hacksaw or a cutting wheel on your Dremel tool (that is what I did).

Third, cut a board from a pallet that has a unique and interesting shape to be several inches longer than your bottle on either end. You can stain it, paint it, or leave it bare. Use wood screws to attach the ceiling plate to the board. Attach the ring hanger to the bottle neck and then thread it onto the rod.

Last, attach a wall hanger (like a picture frame hanger) to the back of the piece of wood to hang it with and you’re done! Simple, unique home decor.

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Wine Cork Bulletin Board

My daughter doesn’t have much wall space in her bedroom and wanted someplace to be able to pin up small mementos, cards, etc. There is a narrow space next to her closet that a typical bulletin board would not fit in so, of course, I decided to make one. The cost? $10

Similar to the wreath, I cut wine corks in half with a sharp knife and used hot glue (multi temp) to attach them to a piece of Styrofoam. You can cut Styrofoam into any shape that will work for you. The glue holds well to the foam, better than other backings I have found.

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I simply glued them in a two over two pattern since they are roughly the same size. You may need to cut the corks to fit near the ends so they will be flush to the edge. Alternate the cut ends for a more even look. (I learned this later, sad face). One of the most interesting things I learned with this project is that you can cut open the rubber corks and hot glue them as well. In the past, I didn’t use them because they would not stick with the glue but this was the first time I tried gluing the inside of the cork and it worked! (note the black corks below)

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Once the foam was completely covered, we needed to figure out how to hang it on the wall. I pinned ribbon around the edges to hide the foam and add some color. The photos are a little misleading in that you CAN see some of the foam through the corks. I think this is because I didn’t take the time to cut them and make them fit tightly. You can certainly do a better job on yours! My daughter will just be covering the gaps with stuff. I used eye screws at the top, screwed into the corks. Then the same ribbon was threaded through to make a hanger.
  

Ugly Oak from ’83

HAPPY NEW YEAR! – Bring on new projects.

The new house looked exactly as it did in 1983 when they built it. Everything is oak, everything. The family who lived here before us, lived here for 20 years and did not upgrade anything. One area that sorely needed upgrading is the bathrooms. I have already completely redone the powder room on the main level because, let’s face it, that is the one that everyone will see and use when they visit. We have two full bathrooms on the second floor however and they have identical vanities with builder grade oak cabinets, white(ish) sinks, and not quite matching counters. They also have oak 5 bulb light fixtures, and oak 3 mirror medicine cabinets. Those may be another post. (FYI – I hope not to offend anyone who likes oak, it’s just that none of mine looks very good and is quite worn and dated).

For this brief post, I just want to document painting the vanity cabinet in the master bathroom. It is a band-aid really as we hope to redesign the space someday. I just couldn’t take the oak anymore. This only took a few hours and then overnight to dry completely. ┬áHere is how it looked before painting.

Before painting. Worn oak.

Before painting. Worn oak.

Here is a better picture of the ugly.

Here is a better picture of the ugly.

It is really simple to paint these cabinets. I chose a dark red color but any color will work. First remove the doors and sand down all the surfaces lightly with 180 grit sanding block or paper. Wipe everything down with a damp cloth after to get the sanding dust off. Then I used a 2″ bristle brush but any brush size will do. You don’t need a wide brush because you want to get into the corners pretty easily.

Contrast between old and new color.

Contrast between old and new color.

I applied two coats to all surfaces and I chose to paint both front and back of each door. I did not paint the inside of the cabinet. Once you have finished and let the paint dry 24 hours, you can attach the doors. Now is a great time to change out any hardware if you like. I chose not to but I did sand the hinges to brighten them without showing all the brass.

Hinges with old grime and tarnish.

Hinges with old grime and tarnish.

Vanity After.

Vanity After.

Hinges after being sanded with the same sanding block.

Hinges after being sanded with the same sanding block.

This is the paint I chose in satin finish. I barely used much of the quart.

This is the paint I chose in satin finish. I barely used much of the quart.